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Dangerous Liaisons
http://forum.marie-antoinette.org/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=1094
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Author:  Marija Vera [ Sat Mar 07, 2009 10:40 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Dangerous Liaisons

I would like to know too!
They changed that sentence for the movie and I like it that way – It’s beyond my control.
I think it is the same in French (as in Italian and Serbian translations - non è colpa mia and nije moja krivica – It’s not my fault) although I would like to hear how that sounds.

This reminded me on Enigma's Mea Culpa! 8)

Author:  Rosalie [ Sun Mar 08, 2009 2:39 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Dangerous Liaisons

Yes, I also quite like "it's beyond my control", because it plays on "control". which is one of the main concepts of the book. I also like "it's not my falt", because I find it so true...A lot of people break other people's hearts, even nowadays, saying "I'm sorry, it's not my fault", and the more so when they're scared by their wn feelings...I found it one of those true observations that made me passionate about the book/movie.

Author:  Marija Vera [ Thu Mar 12, 2009 5:10 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Dangerous Liaisons

I prefer it’s beyond my control because he indicates that it was how it had to be, that he had no influence, which is hypocritical and I would slap his face. It's not my fault is hypocritical as well, he justifying himself, again like he wasn’t a part of it, still, in my opinion, not as strong and beautiful as it’s beyond my control. This sentence is one great plus for the movie. Only it wouldn’t sound great translated into my language, that phrase isn’t commonly used so to translate it literally wouldn’t be the best solution. :|

Author:  baron de batz [ Fri Mar 13, 2009 10:22 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Dangerous Liaisons

The original Frenh version is simply "ce n'est pas ma faute"....

Author:  Rosalie [ Sun Mar 15, 2009 3:28 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Dangerous Liaisons

Oh, really?
Well, that's very interesting! Because I also preferred "it's beyond my control", for quite the same reasons as Marja Vera's...Sometimes translations are even better than the original!

Author:  Marquis [ Wed Mar 18, 2009 3:56 am ]
Post subject:  Danger Liaisons

I was just wondering if anyone has read Les Liaisons dangereuses (Dangerous Liaisons). I watched the movie today and i thought it was okay, but I don't know if the book will be worth reading now that I have seen the movie. I was just wondering if anyone has read the book and seen the movie and can tell me if the plot line is exactly the same if yall could just help me I would be most gracious. Thank You.

Author:  jimcheval [ Wed Mar 18, 2009 5:26 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Danger Liaisons

It's pretty close, but there's a few things that would be boring on film that are converted into a more modern expression.

Really though comparing a film to a book is always problematic, especially when the book is from centuries back. The novel is epistolary - that is, written as an exchange of letters and the voices of the individual narrators are more important. It's tightly written for the most part and pretty diverting. But if you're expecting a costume drama on paper, don't bother.

Author:  Marija Vera [ Wed Mar 18, 2009 11:44 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Danger Liaisons

viewtopic.php?f=2&t=1094

Author:  Marija Vera [ Sun Mar 22, 2009 9:05 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Dangerous Liaisons

Here are some quotes from the movie. I just cannot choose my favorite, although I always liked this - Like most intellectuals, he's intensely stupid and And it's not that I want to have you. All I want is to deserve you:lol:



Vicomte de Valmont: It's beyond my control.
________________________________________
Marquise de Merteuil: You'll find the shame is like the pain, you only feel it once.
________________________________________
Marquise de Merteuil: I've distilled every thing to one single principle: win or die.
________________________________________
Vicomte de Valmont: And it's not that I want to have you. All I want is to deserve you.
________________________________________
Madame Marie de Tourvel: ...I'm beginning to think you planned the whole exercise.
Vicomte de Valmont: I had no idea you were staying here! Not that it would have disturbed me in the slightest if I had known. You see, until I met you, I had only ever experienced desire. Love, never.
Madame Marie de Tourvel: That's enough.
Vicomte de Valmont: No, no, you made an accusation and you must allow me the opportunity to defend myself! Now, I'm not going to deny that I was aware of your beauty. But the point is, this has nothing to do with your beauty. As I got to know you, I began to realize that beauty was the least of your qualities. I became fascinated by your goodness. I was drawn in by it. I didn't know what was happening to me. And it was only when I began to feel actual, physical pain every time you left the room that it dawned on me: I was in love, for the first time in my life. I knew it was hopeless, but that didn't matter to me. And it's not that I want to have you. All I want is to deserve you. Tell me what to do. Show me how to behave. I'll do anything you say.
________________________________________
Vicomte de Valmont: You see. I have no intention of breaking down her prodigiousness. I want her to believe in god and virtue and the sanctity of marriage, and still, not be able to stop herself. I want the excitement of watching her betray everything that's most important to her.
________________________________________
Marquise de Merteuil: Adopt a less marital tone.
________________________________________
Marquise de Merteuil: When I came out into society I was 15. I already knew then that the role I was condemned to, namely to keep quiet and do what I was told, gave me the perfect opportunity to listen and observe. Not to what people told me, which naturally was of no interest to me, but to whatever it was they were trying to hide. I practiced detachment. I learn how to look cheerful while under the table I stuck a fork onto the back of my hand. I became a virtuoso of deceit. I consulted the strictest moralists to learn how to appear, philosophers to find out what to think, and novelists to see what I could get away with, and in the end it all came down to one wonderfully simple principle: win or die.
________________________________________
Vicomte de Valmont: I promised her my eternal love, and I actually thought that for a couple of hours.
________________________________________
Marquise de Merteuil: Like most intellectuals, he's intensely stupid.
________________________________________
Vicomte de Valmont: Why do you suppose we only feel compelled to chase the ones who run away?
Marquise de Merteuil: Immaturity?
________________________________________
Madame de Rosemonde: I'm sorry to say this but those who are most worthy of love are never made happy by it. Do you still think men love the way we do? No... men enjoy the happiness they feel. We can only enjoy the happiness we give. They are not capable of devoting themselves exclusively to one person. So to hope to be made happy by love is a certain cause of grief.
________________________________________
Vicomte de Valmont: You see, I have no intentions of breaking down her prejudices. I want her to believe in God and virtue and the sanctity of marriage, and still not be able to stop herself. I want the pleasure of watching her betray everything that is most important to her. Surely you can understand that. I thought betrayal was your favorite word.
Marquise de Merteuil: No, no...”cruelty." I always think that has a nobler ring to it.
________________________________________
Marquise de Merteuil: When one woman strikes at the heart of another she seldom misses, and the wound is invariably fatal.
________________________________________
Marquise de Merteuil: I've always known I was meant to dominate your sex and avenge my own.
________________________________________
Marquise de Merteuil: Well I had no choice, did I? I'm a woman. Women are obliged to be far more skillful than men. You can ruin our reputation and our life with a few well-chosen words. So of course I had to invent not only myself but ways of escape no one has every thought of before. And I've succeeded because I've always known I was born to dominate your sex and avenge my own.
________________________________________
Vicomte de Valmont: I often wonder how you manage to invent yourself.
________________________________________
Marquise de Merteuil: Tell us we should think of the opera.
Chevalier Danceny: Oh, it's sublime, don't you find?
Marquise de Merteuil: Monsieur Darceny is one of those rare eccentrics who come here to listen to the music.
________________________________________
Vicomte de Valmont: Be careful of the Marquise
Chevalier Danceny: You must permit me to treat with skepticism anything you have to say about her.
Vicomte de Valmont: Nevertheless, I must tell you in this affair, we are both her creatures, as I believe her letters to me will prove. When you have read them, you may decide to circulate them.
________________________________________
Marquise de Merteuil: When it comes to the marriage, one man is as good as the next. And even the least accommodating is less trouble than a mother.
________________________________________
Vicomte de Valmont: Now, yes or no? It is up to you, of course. I will merely confine myself to remarking that a "no" will be regarded as a declaration of war. A single word is all that is required.
Marquise de Merteuil: All right. War!
________________________________________
Madame de Rosemonde: [referring to the Vicomte de Valmont] What is true of most men is doubly so of him.

Author:  Rosalie [ Mon Mar 23, 2009 9:02 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Dangerous Liaisons

Thank you Marja Vera!!!! :angel8: I remember them all from the Italian of my book and movie, and it's great to see how they sound in English!
It's hard to tell my favourite one...

Quote:
When one woman strikes at the heart of another she seldom misses, and the wound is invariably fatal.

This is sooo true!


And this is very true as well:
Quote:
Vicomte de Valmont: Why do you suppose we only feel compelled to chase the ones who run away?
Marquise de Merteuil: Immaturity?


I also loved Merteuil' famous monologue, that is one of the highest points of the book, according to me.

And this:
Quote:
Vicomte de Valmont: Now, yes or no? It is up to you, of course. I will merely confine myself to remarking that a "no" will be regarded as a declaration of war. A single word is all that is required.
Marquise de Merteuil: All right. War!


I absolutely loved!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! So much so in the book, where the dialogue happens only through letters...I imagine Valmont receiving the letter with the only words "Then, war" :lol:

Author:  Marija Vera [ Mon Mar 23, 2009 11:30 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Dangerous Liaisons

You’re welcome!!! :angel10: I’ve found them on the internet.

I really like this :roll: -
Marija Vera wrote:
Marquise de Merteuil: You'll find the shame is like the pain, you only feel it once.


This is rather depressive -
Marija Vera wrote:
No... men enjoy the happiness they feel. We can only enjoy the happiness we give. They are not capable of devoting themselves exclusively to one person.


and :lol: -
Marija Vera wrote:
Vicomte de Valmont: I promised her my eternal love, and I actually thought that for a couple of hours.

Author:  baron de batz [ Fri Jan 28, 2011 10:41 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Dangerous Liaisons

Last night I saw an excellent production of "Les Liaisons dangéreuses" in French in a wonderful small theatre in Paris called the Théâtre Essaion.

It really is a magical thing to listen to that 18th century French text, oozing class and intelligence with every word. People then, at least a certain class of people, used language in such a sensual and communicative way. That has gone. No-one speaks like that anymore. We use economy in all things, even speech. Imagine being able to reply like that so quickly, like a duel of words, each phrase inviting reflection, each line like a piece of jewelry, sparkling and rich.

The setting of the play, the little theatre, was quite stunning. We were down in an ancient vaulted mediaeval cellar, with large yellow stoned crumbling brick walls, a bit like the section of the old Louvre in the museum if anyone has seen that. Apparently it was an old hideout of the Knights of the Temple. The place seated about 50 people, and there was no stage as such, they just acted on the stone floor of the cellar, and the audience were partly obscured by the thick stone vaults rising up to the ceiling. As they used real candles, there was quite an atmosphere, like in some ancient dungeon or prison. Paris still reserves surprizes for me.

Author:  Ludy [ Thu Feb 10, 2011 8:22 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Dangerous Liaisons

Rosalie wrote:
Quote:
When one woman strikes at the heart of another she seldom misses, and the wound is invariably fatal.

This is sooo true!



This is my favourite quote as well.

Author:  Orleans87 [ Mon May 30, 2011 3:57 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Dangerous Liaisons

Oh, I love the book.
I didn't think they could pull off the movie but I was wrong.
They couldn't pick anyone better as Glenn Close to play Marquise de Merteuil.
And John Malkovich was extremely seductive as Vicomte de Valmont.

There is another, British Version called "Valmont" with Colin Firth. This movie is enjoyable as well but I like the other one better!

Author:  Hellou_Librorum [ Mon Jun 06, 2011 12:59 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Dangerous Liaisons

jimcheval wrote:
It's pretty close, but there's a few things that would be boring on film that are converted into a more modern expression.

Really though comparing a film to a book is always problematic, especially when the book is from centuries back. The novel is epistolary - that is, written as an exchange of letters and the voices of the individual narrators are more important. It's tightly written for the most part and pretty diverting. But if you're expecting a costume drama on paper, don't bother.


I read the book for a major paper, since I was too lazy to translate from French. For a weighty assignment I read so much literary analysis I don't know if I can even form my own opinion anymore. :p

But now I have spare time I should go back and read it in French so I am not a lazy hobo. Random question: did anyone find Dancey grating?

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