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Let them eat cake?
http://forum.marie-antoinette.org/viewtopic.php?f=37&t=564
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Author:  bluemarie12493 [ Fri Jan 19, 2007 9:39 pm ]
Post subject:  Let them eat cake?

Did MA realy say "Let them eat cake"?

Author:  Louis-Charles [ Fri Jan 19, 2007 9:49 pm ]
Post subject: 

No she never said that it is an invention.
Marie-Antoinette was generous and nice! :wink:

Author:  Pimprenelle [ Fri Jan 19, 2007 10:45 pm ]
Post subject: 

Just take a look :
http://ask.yahoo.com/20021122.html

Author:  bluemarie12493 [ Fri Jan 19, 2007 11:00 pm ]
Post subject: 

Thank you I shall check it out later.

Author:  Louis XVI [ Fri Jan 19, 2007 11:05 pm ]
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No she never did say it! :shock: :shock: :shock:

It is rumored that Louis XIV's wife (not Louis XVI's wife!) said this nearly 100 years earlier. This phrase was attributted to M.A. by the revolutionaries who demonized her, and that is all we heard about her in history class...up till now!

Author:  Moose [ Mon Mar 05, 2007 7:12 pm ]
Post subject: 

I have heard different explanations. One is that Marie Leczinska said it. One is that Madame Sophie said something about the poor having to eat pastry crust if they had no bread, and this was misquoted and attributed to Antoinette. One is that Antoinette actually said 'let them eat brioche' and meant it as a kindly suggestion and not a dismissive remark. And another is that it was never said at all by anyone. The theory I have heard more often is that it was said by Marie Leczinska.

Author:  Louis-Charles [ Mon Mar 05, 2007 7:33 pm ]
Post subject: 

Yes you're right Moose, all these explanations have been formulated.... :D

But I think that Marie-Antoinette did not say anything....it was just lie like much of others :D

Author:  Moose [ Mon Mar 05, 2007 7:34 pm ]
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I don't think she said it either - I don't think any serious historian has ever tried to claim that she did :) - but I'd be interested to know if ANYONE ever said it, or a variant on it.

Author:  Louis-Charles [ Mon Mar 05, 2007 7:36 pm ]
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Personally I do not know any historian nor even romancer to have written that she had said that… :?

Author:  Moose [ Tue Mar 06, 2007 7:46 pm ]
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Well I know that she didn't say it and that most biographers don't think that she did either :) But there seems to be some confusion about the origin of the phrase/myth and why it was attributed to her and I was wondering where it really came from.

Author:  mdidier [ Mon Mar 19, 2007 6:56 pm ]
Post subject: 

I heard this explanation:

she actually referred to the "cake" that is created in the bread-making molds of her time, known as "croute"... which translates into "cake" as in the expression "caked over"...

"cake" in the dessert sense would be "gateau"....

but I doubt that interpretation.... the proponent of that interpretation strikes me as a "snob"... meaning some one without nobility; from he Spanish suffix added to non-royalty students: s.nob. = sin nobleza...

Author:  Louis-Charles [ Mon Mar 19, 2007 7:00 pm ]
Post subject: 

The sentence in french is :
"Ils n'ont pas de pain? Ils n'ont qu'à manger de la brioche"

And there is a whole tradition with this “brioche”, which was eaten in certain occasion I believe… it can explain why this sentence was marked in other circumstances by other people… but not Marie-Antoinette :D

Author:  mdidier [ Mon Mar 19, 2007 7:18 pm ]
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...but is it documented that MA did in fact say that?

or, what is the source of that sentence? JJ Rousseau?

I prefer la brioche doree anyway...

Author:  Louis-Charles [ Mon Mar 19, 2007 7:24 pm ]
Post subject: 

Quote:
...but is it documented that MA did in fact say that?


I don't know a historian who wrote that Marie-Antoinette said this sentence....and knowing the character of Marie-Antoinette, nice, pleasant, and concerned of poverty, I understand that she could not say that :D

It is Sophie, an aunt of Louis XVI who would have said that :? But very before the revolution...

Author:  mdidier [ Mon Mar 19, 2007 7:27 pm ]
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que vous etes beau-parleur...

but what I meant is... what is the source of the sentence? who quotes MA as saying those very words? JJ Rousseau?

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