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 Women's 18th Century Shoes 
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Royalty
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Post Re: Women's 18th Century Shoes
DreamersRose wrote:
The heels aren't very high in most cases, and usually have a good solid heel that won't make you stumble. The embroidery and detail is exquisite. The thing that surprises me is how high the arches are. Our feet today are flatter than they were evidently in the 18th Century. There's been another change in the shape of bodies over the years, so I don't think that is too unlikely. I bought a pattern once at Colonial Williamsburg for an 18th.


Finally someone who agrees with me. The heels don't look very high. And if they are at least they have a sturdy heel.

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Mon Oct 13, 2008 12:46 am
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Marquis/Marquise
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Post Re: Women's 18th Century Shoes
Hellou_Librorum wrote:
Those are lovely shoes Silliage de la Reine! I envy your beautiful shoes, I'm quite sure they'll look lovely on you.


PS:

Where did you get them?

Oh no, these aren't mine... I sure wish though. I'm just listing my favorites that I've seen online. The first one in blue, that one is a modern version made by someone else. But I will make one myself for halloween next year. I'm collecting accessories now and planning ahead so I look authentic. I'm undecided about the wig though... what do you think about this... behold!!!

Image Found this online and my husband says he'd help me build my wig close to that you see there, I'm creative, he's good with his hands. Can you imagine the reaction of people when they see that on you???

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Thu Oct 16, 2008 4:06 am
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Royalty
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Post Re: Women's 18th Century Shoes
That wigs looks so large it would be painful to wear!

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Thu Oct 16, 2008 1:01 pm
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Royalty
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Post Re: Women's 18th Century Shoes
There is a wig topic. It's called "Amazing Hair."

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Thu Oct 16, 2008 1:02 pm
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Marquis/Marquise
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Post Re: Women's 18th Century Shoes
Yeah, I noticed the wig topic after I posted this. I presume it would be difficult to wear as well as painful, but it'll be comical to wear it out even just for a moment. In the "amazing hair" thread, I posted a picture of a women with a really high pouf, and from what I read about her wig, she said it stayed on, and didn't hurt even with the ship on her head. I suppose if I limit the accessories on the hair, it'll be lighter.

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Thu Oct 16, 2008 9:26 pm
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Noble
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Post Re: Women's 18th Century Shoes
jolie_blon wrote:
Does anyone know if Marie Antoinette had diamonds embedded on the soles of her shoes? Seems to me that I read that somewhere....? :queen:


I think that was just a Paul Simon song....

The way shoes are constructed now, they are designed to keep the weight on the ball of a woman's foot, which makes it easier to walk. These shoes seem like they would require a more pointed toe all the time, and that would be painful. Of course, it's hard to tell when you're just looking at empty shoes with no feet in them.

And what did people do when it got muddy out? Was there an eighteenth century equivalent to galoshes, or were you simply forced to ruin your shoes and buy replacements? I suppose if you could afford shoes as nice as these in the first place, that wouldn't be too much of a hardship, and peasants would have been wearing sturdier leather shoes. But did the nobility ever wear sturdier, non-ruinable-by-rain shoes? I swear I have a real reason for wondering besides perverse curiosity.


Wed Nov 26, 2008 7:37 am
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Royalty
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Post Re: Women's 18th Century Shoes
Yes there were shoes that everyone wore to prevent their shoes from getting ruined.

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Wed Nov 26, 2008 2:42 pm
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Noble
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Post Re: Women's 18th Century Shoes
I was sure there must be. Do you have any idea where I might be able to find more information about this?


Wed Nov 26, 2008 9:36 pm
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Comte/Comtesse
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Post Re: Women's 18th Century Shoes
I found this information in "The History of Footwear":
Rococo 1715-1775
The toe of the women’s shoe was sharp and upcurved at the beginning of the period. By the 1760’s, it had become blunter. At the end of the period, the toe was no longer upcurving, and had a matched pointed tongue.

The heels, at the beginning of this period, were high and thick. The Louis heel, splayed at the base and waisted, was very popular until the 1760’s.

Overshoes were still quite popular but were modified to fit the shoe by giving them the same toe shapes. The fitted clog also continued throughout the period. Pattens were still worn, but had been relegated to country wear and for the lower classes in most cases.
Boots were worn chiefly by men, but women could wear them for riding. A calf-high kid, front-laced boot was quite fashionable for women. The toe was in line with shoe fashions, and the boot usually had a feminine, Italian heel.

For men, boots were reserved for riding and the military. There was also a growing interest in horse racing, so the jockey boot became quite important during this time.

In the 1750’s a new half boot entered fashion, and was used mostly for shooting and riding.

Boots were tall in black leather with a brown turned down cuff. Occasionally, the boots could be made with a white top to match white breeches.

1775-1815
At the beginning of this period, the heels were still quite flimsy, as seen during the previous years. By the later 1780’s, heels became more practical, suiting the sturdier leather uppers. Women did, however, have their choice of heel heights and shapes. The thin stiletto, which had been derived from the Italian heel, was still worn, as were arched wedge heels, true wedges, and stacked or single lifts.

The toes of women’s shoes were quite pointed at the beginning of the period, with a matched pointed tongue. In 1786-7, there was a brief fling of sharply pointed, upcurved toes. This short-lived trend is probably the result of the English craze for Chinoiserie.

Small silver clasps remain as the last hint of the previous buckle. These were frequently worn with a fringe. Rosettes are also seen, but never reach the size or elaboratness of those of earlier centuries.

Sandals begin to be worn in the 1790’s, but the open cut outs are frequently underlain with embroidered silk to hide the naked foot. At the very end of the period, in 1813, Grecian sandals appear, leaving the foot almost bare. These were low cut pumps with ribbons to cross and tie around the ankle. These were so simple to make that wealthy women took to making their own as a hobby.

Overshoes are still worn when necessary for protection outdoors. In the 1790’s, these are fashioned with the same sandal pattern as mentioned above, with a spring loop to hook around the heel. By 1808, a flat soled, hinged wooden version appears, to go with the new flat shoes. Pattens also continue, abandoning the wedge heel in favour of a flat sole, with the shape matching the shoes.
In the 1770’s and 1780’s, boots are again seen in everyday dress, though they were worn primarily for walking and never for a formal occasion. As the period moved toward an atmosphere of revolution, there was a natural swing to boots for fashion as well as military wear. Boots were, however, generally worn only for morning. Boots such as the Hessian and the Wellington predominated for the remainder of the period. The top boot became the trademark of the English, but because it was only practical with breeches, most men wore the riding boot with the new trousers.

Women’s boots were not their principal wear. In 1800, a half boot that went to the knee appeared for women. These boots were put on with the aid of hooks, and worn for riding and driving.

Boots were also made into rights and lefts, but this happened later than with men’s shoes. In 1800, for example, soldiers were told to wear their boots (which were straights) on alternate feet on alternate days, so they would last longer.


Sat Dec 27, 2008 8:15 pm
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Royalty
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Post Re: Women's 18th Century Shoes
Wow! Thank you, that's very interesting!

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Sat Dec 27, 2008 9:06 pm
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Duc/Duchesse
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Post Re: Women's 18th Century Shoes
great, that you found this article :queen:

reine :angel6:


Tue Dec 30, 2008 8:38 am
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