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 Women Artists in the 18th century 
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Royalty
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Joined: Fri Oct 26, 2007 2:25 pm
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Post Women Artists in the 18th century
Apparently there is more women artists than I thought. I have decided to start a topic on women artists and their portraits.

:)


I'll start with a portrait painted by a woman.

This is the King of Naples with his family, Angelica Kauffman 1783.

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showImage.jpg
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Wed Sep 24, 2008 2:26 am
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Royalty
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Joined: Sat Nov 04, 2006 2:45 pm
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Location: Hungary
Post Re: Women Artists in the 18th century
Good idea, Hellou. Maybe it would be better if this topic transferred to Art, but whatever. Sorry for not answering so far, I've just realized this topic.
I'd carry on with Rosalba Carriera. She was a great Venetian pastellist, born in 1675 and died in 1757. Her art style is rococo, specialized in portraits.


Attachments:
Gustavus Hamilton (1710–1746), Second Viscount Boyne, in Masquerade Costume, 1730–31_carriera.jpg
Gustavus Hamilton (1710–1746), Second Viscount Boyne, in Masquerade Costume, 1730–31_carriera.jpg [ 108.96 KiB | Viewed 2817 times ]
retrato-de-rosalva-carriera.jpg
retrato-de-rosalva-carriera.jpg [ 39.75 KiB | Viewed 2817 times ]

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Sun Feb 08, 2009 11:58 am
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Post Re: Women Artists in the 18th century
I presume Vigée-Le Brun (Elisabeth Louise (1755-1842)) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vigee_Le_Brun has been mentioned elsewhere on this board:
Image
Image

Aside from her numerous paintings, her very vivid memoires are well worth reading:
http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/v#a25622
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/lebrun/memoirs/memoirs.html

Quote:
It was in the year 1779 that I painted the Queen for the first time; she was then in the heyday of her youth and beauty. Marie Antoinette was tall and admirably built, being somewhat stout, but not excessively so. Her arms were superb, her hands small and perfectly formed, and her feet charming. She had the best walk of any woman in France, carrying her head erect with a dignity that stamped her queen in the midst of her whole court, her majestic mien, however, not in the least diminishing the sweetness and amiability of her face. To any one who has not seen the Queen it is difficult to get an idea of all the graces and all the nobility combined in her person. Her features were not regular; she had inherited that long and narrow oval peculiar to the Austrian nation. Her eyes were not large; in colour they were almost blue, and they were at the same time merry and kind. Her nose was slender and pretty, and her mouth not too large, though her lips were rather thick. But the most remarkable thing about her face was the splendour of her complexion. I never have seen one so brilliant, and brilliant is the word, for her skin was so transparent that it bore no umber in the painting. Neither could I render the real effect of it as I wished. I had no colours to paint such freshness, such delicate tints, which were hers alone, and which I had never seen in any other woman.

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Sun Feb 08, 2009 4:52 pm
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Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2008 2:19 pm
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Post Re: Women Artists in the 18th century
Angelica and Eliz Vigee... they are the two that always come up dont they.
Angelica had quite a long stay in London... was celebrated and courted by rich
patrons and made a lot of money.
In 1980 she was shocked by the Gordon Riots and soon after left for Italy.
In Rome and Naples she found lots of clients and lucrative commissions.. not least
from all the rich British aristocracy doing the " Grand Tour "

I suppose what links the two women is their sheer industry and hard work...
the way they could apply themselves to oil and canvas day after day after day...
They were amazing and their work stands as silent testament to their hard work
and fine artistic skills.


Sat Sep 12, 2009 11:45 pm
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