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 Underwear in 18th century 
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Royalty
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Post Re: Underwear in 18th century
Oh. Please don't apologize I'm just an imbecile.

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Tue Apr 01, 2008 7:27 pm
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Post Re: Underwear in 18th century
No, don’t say that! I should write more clearly in the future to avoid the confusion. Funny situation though. :lol:

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Last edited by Marija Vera on Sat Aug 23, 2008 11:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Wed Apr 02, 2008 10:50 am
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Post Re: Underwear in 18th century
Did anyone notice anything missing? Like panties, knickers, or something? Not there. They didn't wear them. They also wore a flat V-shaped board called a"stomacher" in the front of the dress. It slipped into a pocket and gave the wearer that fashionable point below the waist and pushed up the breasts that everyone admired so much. After a woman was married, she usually wore a fichu, something like a scarf or shawl, around her neck and over her bosom.


Thu Aug 21, 2008 2:50 am
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Royalty
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Post Re: Underwear in 18th century
It was actually the corset that pushed the breasts up or together thus achieving cleavage. As you can see here DreamersRose.

http://members.aol.com/dressmup/corset2.jpg

The stomacher was attached to the corset ( such as this one)

http://www.vintagetextile.com/images/Early/1381.jpg

Stomachers were parts that were usually used on a Robe a la Francais, and sometimes on the Robe l"Anglais which completed the dress. These were decorated with bows or embroidery.

Like this dress

http://www.rijksmuseum.nl/images/aria/b ... ftcoulisse

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Thu Aug 21, 2008 3:10 am
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Post Re: Underwear in 18th century
Yes, that's exactly what I meant, if it wasn't clear. Looks like the common people wore corsets instead of the stomacher.


Sat Aug 23, 2008 2:15 am
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Post Re: Underwear in 18th century
Everyone wore corsets. Women were deemed "loose" if they did not wear a corset. Working class women wore corsets but ones that gave them greater flexibility.

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Sat Aug 23, 2008 2:23 am
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Post Re: Underwear in 18th century
Thank you Monsieur Andre for sharing your detailed and useful knowledge with us. As usual, I hadn't checked around before I opened that other topic about the same subject and I apologize for this. I do this a lot it seems... As for the other stuff mentioned, I attribute every bit of it to poor hygiene and nothing else. If one doesn't scrub with fresh clean water and soap, then one gets germs and all kinds of buildup and nastiness. This applies equally to men as well as women. I do not see how the women bled all over their dresses and did not wear anything at all 'down there' during their menstrual periods. I do not find this believable as they would have left trails of blood all over the floors and this would have been common knowledge to all historians. Even though they were not clean, they would have certainly had the sense and modesty to use SOMETHING either pinned or tied to themselves in order to absorb the flow. Perhaps a bit of leakage was what that writer was referring to when he spoke of their dresses, but I find the idea that they wore absolutely nothing during menstruation absurd and almost IMPOSSIBLE. My Goodness, I have had enough of this subject...

Ray

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Mon Sep 15, 2008 12:59 am
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Post Re: Underwear in 18th century
During their periods, they wore belts that were kind of like garter belts that had a rag attached running between the legs, which could then be removed and washed.


Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:22 am
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Post Re: Underwear in 18th century
Well, there you have it. Thank you Dreamoutloud for clearing up that messy subject. Your quality input is always appreciated. :)

Thanks again,
Ray

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Wed Sep 17, 2008 3:57 am
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Post Re: Underwear in 18th century
dreamoutloud wrote:
During their periods, they wore belts that were kind of like garter belts that had a rag attached running between the legs, which could then be removed and washed.

I want to believe in that! Thank you.

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Wed Sep 17, 2008 10:01 am
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Post Re: Underwear in 18th century
The question is, was it used in the 18th century or it is a 19th century invention??


Attachments:
Ladies' Sanitary (menstrual) Belt.jpg
Ladies' Sanitary (menstrual) Belt.jpg [ 19.89 KiB | Viewed 3545 times ]

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Wed Jun 29, 2011 3:09 pm
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Post Re: Underwear in 18th century
Yuk! :(

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Wed Jun 29, 2011 3:12 pm
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Post Re: Underwear in 18th century
baron de batz wrote:
Yuk! :(


What is wrong with it?? It is a good solution.

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Mon Jul 25, 2011 5:03 pm
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Post Re: Underwear in 18th century
I guess....just doesn't look too nice! :)

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Mon Jul 25, 2011 6:43 pm
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Post Re: Underwear in 18th century
A French Proverb : The more a ram smells, the more the goat loves him.

Hygiene in the 18th century is almost unbelievable to the 20th century mind. This whole idea that water not be used to bathe regularly seems quite gross to us today.
The reality of their personal hygiene is very different than what is acceptable today. I looked into some of the things I wondered about and found out that there was alot of dental decay and missing teeth and that the toothpick and a cloth to wipe the teeth was about the extent of dental care exercised. Head and body lice also was known to exist and many people carried it. As far as women were concerned, I cannot find anyone who says they wore underpants, just a long chemise with nothing covering their "lady parts". The reason for this was to let the area breathe, so to speak. We know that odors develop much more strongly in confined areas - and women today risk infection by tight confining panties. Most sources also say that during their periods, women bled into their clothing. Ewwww! Today's woman cannot imagine this! But - this does explain the lack of any mention of what women did during menstruation - it looks like most did nothing! This type of odor, along with body odor and mouth odor does not make a very pretty picture for 18th century women or men! There are contempoary writings of how bad people smelled - of a husband being sickened by the odor of his wife, etc., etc. People's homes are said to have really smelled foul from chamberpots and of course Versailles itself was urinated in where ever someone found the need. YUK, is right!


Sat Aug 13, 2011 9:30 pm
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